A Merger in the Gig Economy…Or Not

As part of my research for my new book, Thriving in the Gig Economy, which will be coming out next spring, I had the opportunity to interview Stephen DeWitt, the  CEO of WorkMarket. http://www.workmarket.com

Although it sounds banal to say it, Stephen is a visionary about the future of work and how technology will enable on-demand access to skilled workers globally  in a marketplace that many will find hard to _dsc5674imagine or even anticipate.  As I explain in my book, in today's environment, the immediacy of access to resources is highly conditioned by the skill set sought; I want my Uber driver right away, but I may be a bit disconcerted if my interim CFO showed up on my doorstep in 5 minutes.  Our mental models are not quite set at the right speed  now, for the way Stephen sees the future. Stephen sees that CFO, or chemical engineer or strategist arriving seamlessly when a company needs it  thanks to custom talent pools and the algorithms that will continue to evolve and load balance expertise levels.

As he shared with me as well as John Battelle in his great newco piece, A Total Rethink of How Work Should Work  https://shift.newco.co/a-total-rethink-of-how-work-should-work-5dc3980ea52#.76ychzmxi , to imagine the future you need to think of the futures you know.  Think Star Trek, for example, if Captain Kirk is in need of new expertise to make the next voyage, do you think he is just going to list it on LinkedIn?

Which brings me to the point of this post.  A major acquisition was finally approved last week to remarkably little fan fair, especially when compared to the press when the deal was announced. LinkedIn is now officially owned by Microsoft, an organization not known for successfully integrating acquisitions. LinkedIn is of course the largest talent marketplace  in the world, even if it doesn't operate like a digital talent platform. (With apologies, of course, to LinkedIn Profinder, which is trying. )

It has a significant role in the Gig Economy, though, since it is a key element of an independent worker's digital brand. Look at me -- I am posting this on LinkedIn in addition to my own blog as part of my own branding strategy. I even have a section in my book on how to optimize your digital image on LinkedIn. So will this primacy as a venue for independent experts to showcase expertise change in the new Microsoft world?

It is hard to say. An article on this topic by Dina Bass on Bloomberg yesterday https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-13/how-microsoft-and-linkedin-can-make-this-expensive-deal-work said a key to the deal is to "let LinkedIn be LinkedIn." The public plan is to keep the two companies separate and develop those ever popular "synergies" to enable skilled professionals to be more productive.  As an Apple fan who has always thought apple design far superior to Microsoft and other platforms,  that didn't seem like a natural outcome to me.  (Let's face it the Microsoft stuff never works quite as well on a mac...)

But my bigger concern came from the video conference the day they announced the deal. Microsoft CEO , Satya Nadella, said he wanted to help make the LinkedIn members more successful in their "jobs".  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/linkedin-microsoft-changing-way-world-works-jeff-weiner In the new world of work, the one that I see and the one Stephen DeWitt sees, it isn't about "jobs" it is about the work and skill sets and managing independent careers. Hopefully the new combined Microsoft and LinkedIn leadership will see that and plan accordingly.

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