Monthly Archives: December 2016

A Merger in the Gig Economy…Or Not

As part of my research for my new book, Thriving in the Gig Economy, which will be coming out next spring, I had the opportunity to interview Stephen DeWitt, the  CEO of WorkMarket. http://www.workmarket.com

Although it sounds banal to say it, Stephen is a visionary about the future of work and how technology will enable on-demand access to skilled workers globally  in a marketplace that many will find hard to _dsc5674imagine or even anticipate.  As I explain in my book, in today's environment, the immediacy of access to resources is highly conditioned by the skill set sought; I want my Uber driver right away, but I may be a bit disconcerted if my interim CFO showed up on my doorstep in 5 minutes.  Our mental models are not quite set at the right speed  now, for the way Stephen sees the future. Stephen sees that CFO, or chemical engineer or strategist arriving seamlessly when a company needs it  thanks to custom talent pools and the algorithms that will continue to evolve and load balance expertise levels.

As he shared with me as well as John Battelle in his great newco piece, A Total Rethink of How Work Should Work  https://shift.newco.co/a-total-rethink-of-how-work-should-work-5dc3980ea52#.76ychzmxi , to imagine the future you need to think of the futures you know.  Think Star Trek, for example, if Captain Kirk is in need of new expertise to make the next voyage, do you think he is just going to list it on LinkedIn?

Which brings me to the point of this post.  A major acquisition was finally approved last week to remarkably little fan fair, especially when compared to the press when the deal was announced. LinkedIn is now officially owned by Microsoft, an organization not known for successfully integrating acquisitions. LinkedIn is of course the largest talent marketplace  in the world, even if it doesn't operate like a digital talent platform. (With apologies, of course, to LinkedIn Profinder, which is trying. )

It has a significant role in the Gig Economy, though, since it is a key element of an independent worker's digital brand. Look at me -- I am posting this on LinkedIn in addition to my own blog as part of my own branding strategy. I even have a section in my book on how to optimize your digital image on LinkedIn. So will this primacy as a venue for independent experts to showcase expertise change in the new Microsoft world?

It is hard to say. An article on this topic by Dina Bass on Bloomberg yesterday https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-13/how-microsoft-and-linkedin-can-make-this-expensive-deal-work said a key to the deal is to "let LinkedIn be LinkedIn." The public plan is to keep the two companies separate and develop those ever popular "synergies" to enable skilled professionals to be more productive.  As an Apple fan who has always thought apple design far superior to Microsoft and other platforms,  that didn't seem like a natural outcome to me.  (Let's face it the Microsoft stuff never works quite as well on a mac...)

But my bigger concern came from the video conference the day they announced the deal. Microsoft CEO , Satya Nadella, said he wanted to help make the LinkedIn members more successful in their "jobs".  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/linkedin-microsoft-changing-way-world-works-jeff-weiner In the new world of work, the one that I see and the one Stephen DeWitt sees, it isn't about "jobs" it is about the work and skill sets and managing independent careers. Hopefully the new combined Microsoft and LinkedIn leadership will see that and plan accordingly.

A New Operating System for the Gig Economy

An article in Forbes today suggested the title of this post, that companies need a new operating system for the Gig Economy.  The article entitled, "How Businesses must Adapt to Accommodate the Growing Freelance Workforce",  http://www.forbes.com/sites/under30network/2016/12/05/how-businesses-must-adapt-to-accommodate-the-growing-freelance-workforce/?utm_source=TWITTER#17edc57f42f5 was written by Peter Johnston, the CEO  and Founder of Lystable,  one of the companies that now comprise what I like to call  the Gig Economy EcoSystem.

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These firms and their founders, like Peter, have recognized that the independent work trend in the United States is not going away.  Between workers wanting more flexibility, technology reducing the market frictions of just in time expertise and a highly mobile workforce the usage of independent workers will only increase.  Given this expected growth, there is money to be made in creating enabling mechanisms to make it easy more more companies to jump on the band wagon.

Lystable, https://www.lystable.com  along with others like ShortList https://shortlist.co/about/ promise to eliminate the logistical problems that can make engaging consultants a human supply chain nightmare.  For unlike employment and its sourcing partner, recruiting wherein a centralized corporate solution is offered, securing independent consulting services often tends to be a one-off endeavor in most companies.  Procurement ( and not recruiting typically) may imposes guidelines and rules that may be followed or not; many savvy managers have figured out over the years how to get around those pesky rules in order for the department to bring in their talent of choice. These external workforce platforms capture contract details, engagement letters, Statements of Work (SOWs)and payment details. Many handle on-boarding and post project reviews. Perhaps most importantly though, they provide an overall dashboard for how external expertise is being deployed in the enterprise.

Johnston points out thee business benefits which are real.  Speaking as someone who dealt with the initial forays of procurement in the vendor management world, creating an appropriate environment for independent talent us well overdue. Changing that operating system is key, but so too is changing the mindset.  Efficiently and effectively using independent talent is a competitive advantage.  And now, as deployment methods are becoming more enabled and thereby  making the workers more mobile, those workers have more options.  They can go to their client of choice.  So just as employers want to be the "Employer of Choice", they also need to give some thought to being the "Client of Choice. " For many firms, that will be quite an operating system change.

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