Monthly Archives: June 2016

Discipline – or not – and the NBA

Discipline, The NBA and Interactional Justice

In the spirit of full disclosure,  I live in San Francisco and I am a Warrior fan. That said, even though I watch all the games, I am not so knowledgeable about the NBA and the rules — that’s what husbands and kids are for…Finally, as I get out all the disclaimers for this blog post, I am a fan of Draymond Green.  I know he can be a bully, but I also know he has been a true stand up guy to his community and alma mater in Michigan. Philanthropy is near and dear to my heart, so I love to see the generosity of athletes when it is done is such a deliberate and authentic way.

Like many others I found the NBA’s actions suspending Green to be  inappropriate, because it goes against all of the rules of discipline.  For 7 years I taught HR to seniors at the University of San Francisco School ff Management. Discipline in organizations is both an art and a science.  Most progressive discipline structures on built upon the framework of ethical principles and have three key elements: Interactional Justice, Procedural Justice and Outcomes Fairness.

Interactional Justice refers to the notion that the discipline takes into account the feelings of the individual involved .  Based on the news coverage, it appeared LeBron’s feelings were highly considered.  Draymond’s feelings of disrespect, which were later echoed by commentator Charles Barkley, were not given as much weight in the calculus.

Procedural Justice is that the methods used to determine the discipline were fair  and that the process is agnostic about the individuals involved.  The fact that this decision was arrived at, not during game 4 , but behind closed doors afterwards does not support a good process.  Similarly,  had this kerfuffle been between LeBron and any one else other than Draymond, a different conclusion would have been reached.

Finally, Outcomes Fairness refers to consistent fairness, knowledge of potential outcomes and penalties in proportion to behavior. Draymond did know that he was approaching the thresh hold for suspension due to his accumulated fouls.  That said, the fact that the flagrant was not assessed during the game but after the fact, makes the outcome seem less objective.  Some commentators have suggested that the suspension is  a “make up call” stemming from the failure  of the officials to call a flagrant during the prior series with Oklahoma, when Green kicked  Steven Adams. That “make-up foul” rationale is the antithesis of outcome fairness, since it occurred in a totally different play off cycle. The officials’ failure to appropriately call the game should not come back to haunt a player two weeks later.

So I think the NBA should clean up its act.  I also think the Warriors may just win this one for Draymond, and wouldn’t that be fitting.

“The Millennial Mindset and the Gig Economy”…not…

The Gig Economy and Career Advancement

Journalism today is not what it used to be.  Gig economy pundit that I am, I get my daily google alerts on anything to with this new economic dynamic.  More often than not, the article is not quite on point, and or has more to do with the sharing economy than the gig economy -- they are related but not synonymous.

Today's headline was from a piece by CBS Boston and was entitled "The Millennial Mindset and the Gig Economy". It opened with Gallup Poll data on the priority the younger generation puts on career advancement.  The challenge though,  is the interview , since many employers want 4 -5 years of experience. A  recent graduate laments that he just does not have the requisite background to be considered.  The piece then jumps to the fact that the gig economy has changed the social contract and it is not clear how it will all settle out.

Really??? I wouldn't blame the gig economy for the fact that may jobs require some level of work experience.  That has nothing to do with any type of social contract, eroded or not,  between employee and employer.  It has more to do with the level of expertise and or training required to successfully perform the tasks associated with the  role.

Maybe the author of the piece should get a new gig that doesn't involve writing about the gig economy...

 

Adventures in the Gig Economy

Thriving in the Gig Economy and the Hourly Nerd

So I am working on a new book, "Thriving in the Gig Economy", a subject I happen to know a lot about from my experience at M Squared Consulting.  That said, though, there are many new players since the days when I ran M Squared.  As fodder for my book, I am walking the  talk and exploring new platforms and using gig economy resources along the way.

I have registered as an expert at a number of sites.  The most remarkable experience was with Hourly Nerd.  (Really, they thought that was a good name, but I digress.) The Hourly Nerd pitch is that the consultants or "nerds"  on their platform come from only select business schools.  To underscore this, they ask that all potential consultants sign up using their business school email.

Now there is the rub.  When I went to business school, email had not yet been invented.  I know I date myself, but that doesn't make me any less qualified as a consultant.  I must say, to Hourly Nerd's credit, they responded immediately  when I pointed out that I did not have a Haas Business School email since that would have been impossible in 1985,  and  since I knew that they were not intending to discriminate against older MBAs,  there had to be another way for me to apply.  Needless to say I was vetted rather quickly after that.

In my 3 weeks of  being in the nerd ranks, I have received 2 inquiries, neither of which was really appropriate for me.  Since I chair a not for profit humanitarian NGO, I received a request to do research for another non-profit in a totally different field.  Clearly they need to work out the difference between functional expertise and industry expertise in their algorithm.  The second was a bit more on point, looking at employee utilization in consulting firms.  However, since the consulting firm I ran was a hybrid firm, providing independent consultants, gig folks or nerds in their parlance ,  to projects my expertise was not quite on point.  As they say, three is a charm, so I wonder what might come next...

In the meantime, I am securing some programming talent in this gig economy as well as research time from some other platforms.  I am intrigued to experience the customer side...I will keep you posted.

 

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